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Helix Wind Energy for Home Use

Helix WindHelix Wind out of San Diego, California has come up with an atypical wind turbine design for home use. While most wind turbines still use the tried and true rotor or propeller style to catch the breeze, the Helix Wind turbines use something more akin to artwork.

The video shows a small demonstration model, but the actual working wind turbines are far larger, providing greater electrical output. Helix Wind now offers a 2kw model (Savonious 2.0) at 6 ft. by 4 ft. and a 5 kw model (Savonious 5.0) at 15 ft. by 4 ft.

Because of their unique design Helix Wind turbines are capable of capturing omni-directional winds and transforming this into electrical energy. In addition, the turbines are extremely quiet, operating just 5 decibels above ambient background noise.

The helical design of the Helix Wind turbines gives the unit an added advantage over other turbines in that they may be installed in residential areas not appropriate for the other turbines. The Savonious units are safe for birds and bats and may be installed in areas of limited air space.

The Helix Wind Savonious units only need a minimum of a 6 mph breeze in which to operate. In most cases, wind turbines on homes will need a building permit and the Helix Wind turbines are no different, so if you buy a unit, be prepared to get a conditional use permit or variance from the city or county in which you live.

The Helix Wind turbines like most other turbines are best suited for homes in states that allow net metering, so that you can roll back the meter on your electric bills. In order to see the rules for net metering in your state check out the map provides by the U. S. Department of Energy.

About Kevin

Kevin is both an environmentalist and a tech guy and has been writing, editing and publishing this blog since 2007. He answers questions related to how you can use tech to go greener.

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